"The Death of the Electric Guitar"

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UnexplodedCow
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Tue Jun 27, 2017 2:58 pm

"The Death of the Electric Guitar Tone Control." - A thread coming to a Kiesel forum near you....
We are entitled to our own, wrong, opinions.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby gumbynotpokey » Tue Jun 27, 2017 5:51 pm

UnexplodedCow wrote:"The Death of the Electric Guitar Tone Control." - A thread coming to a Kiesel forum near you....


"The Death of the Tonewood Debate" - a thread NOT coming to a Kiesel forum near you. :)
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Tabare777 » Thu Jun 29, 2017 5:19 am

arahobob wrote:
Koshchei wrote:As an ERG player, I don't think that the bass is going anywhere. It serves a totally different purpose in a band (and one that's irreplaceable) than a guitar. Two ERGs could work, as in Animals as Leaders, but ultimately, a guitar is a melodic instrument, whereas a bass is rhythmic, tying the ensemble together.


Totally agree


Totally, totally agree...

Guitar aint goin' nowhere, ERG is ERG, Electric bass is Electric bass; two different animals...

BS sells magazines and clicks, peeps are still buying/playing guitars, the fact that there are bands like AAL, STS, Plini etc is plenty of evidence... :soapbox:
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Doctor Doug » Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:43 pm

If electric guitar is dead then my apartment is a morgue.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby wickid » Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:09 am

Doctor Doug wrote:If electric guitar is dead then my apartment is a morgue.


Yes! ... and every case a coffin. Buhwahahahahahaha .... :twisted:
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Doctor Turn » Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:34 am

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ZOMBIE ATTACK MMWWAAAAAAAUUGGHH!!!...
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Casual Madman » Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:52 am

^^^

I could sleep in that graveyard.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:42 am

Here's part of my graveyard from 3 years ago. 5 of them are gone, and there were some changes overall, but it still amounts to an extended family of deadbeats (pun).

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We are entitled to our own, wrong, opinions.

Guitar theorem: G=X+1 where G= guitars one needs, and X = guitars one has.

Do or do not; there is no understand.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Omsong » Sun Jul 02, 2017 11:59 pm

I wonder what the average age of an electric guitar player is today. My guess is that it's above 40, maybe even higher. We could be witnessing the drop in sales corresponding to the aging of the baby boomers. Perhaps it's an economy issue, too. Many of us still haven't fully recovered from the recession of '08 and/or have entered the time when retirement concerns and limited income is restricting our spending on non-essentials.

I also wonder if it's a matter of a narrow perspective. Within the last 150 years, a few other instruments have also had their rise and fall on the popular music stage. Consider the banjo, mandolin and ukulele. At one time each of those instruments dominated the contemporary music scene.

The mandolin and ukulele each had about a 10 year span in popularity. The banjo had a longer influence, dating back to the mid 1800's and continuing into 1930s. Gradually, the electric guitar (because of it's higher volume) replaced the banjo in the big bands as both a rhythm and melody instrument. Even after replacing the banjo, electric guitar was a niche instrument until the 1950s when Les Paul amazed audiences with his virtuosity and then later when Buddy Holly, Elvis and Chuck started a new music trend - rock and roll - centered around the guitar. Early in this transition the Sax often held center stage as a solo instrument while guitar was used in a rhythm backup role. But it had visibility going for it as the pop icons would parade on stage with a guitar slung around their necks. It's when electric guitar moved from behind the scenes to up front in the lights that it's popularity really took off. And gradually the music itself became dominated by the sound of the electric guitar and the skill of it's players.

By the late 70's, however, showmanship and flash dominated the big arena stages. A show was less about the music and more about the stage performance. Sure, guitar's were still mandatory for the style, but the nature of the whole music scene was changing, Guitar faded when audiences started to tire of the hype and flash, opening the way for new musical styles: the music of the hair bands in the 80's was replaced in popularity by Punk which was no longer obsessed with guitar virtuosity. Then Rap and the boy and girl band phenomenon arrived. Both of these styles no longer even required electric guitar, in fact all instrumentation became secondary to the vocals. There was a minor surge in electric guitar in the late 90's with Dave Mathews and Pearl Jam, etc, but nothing compared to earlier times. Of course many of these trends were orchestrated (no pun intended) by the music industry's endless quest for profit.

So, at best, electric guitar had 30 influential years (1955 - 1985). Not too bad compared to the short lives of the ukulele and mandolin crazes which preceded it. Question is, is the hay-day of electric guitar truly over or will it enjoy a revival like the ukulele currently enjoys? Maybe some potential electric guitar players are buying ukuleles instead. Hmmm...
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Doctor Turn » Mon Jul 03, 2017 5:23 am

Just re your timeline: I think the nineties to early 2000's were just as big for the electric guitar if not even bigger. Although in the Eighties you had metal, and an occasional new non metal band like the Clash, the Eighties was more about new wave and bands like Tears For Fears, Human League, Duran Duran, Michael Jackson, Prince dominating popular culture.

In the nineties the electric guitar absolutely dominated culture with post punk acts like Nirvana, RATM, RHCP, and the whole "grunge" movement. It was the age of anti- flash playing, so these guys weren't fire breathers popping out incredible unison runs in odd meters, but the instrument absolutely dominated.

It was the early 2000:s with acts like Brittany Spears, iNSYNC, etc that signaled the reduction of the electric guitar as a featured instrument that defined the core sound of a band.

Nowadays it's not that the electric guitar is dead (or it's only old players buying them, I strenuously disagree with that), but that they're relegated back to the overall sound of the band, like keys or bass. You'll see a guitarist in virtually every band out on stage touring this summer, or on television, or in every orchestra pit... But they're not a tidal wave of new bands where the guitar is out front and in your face, or part of a Cobainesque/Who/Zep/Cream type power trio where all sense of tonic aspect and melody is driven sheerly by an overdriven Strat, Les Paul, or Tele.

But as an instrument considered essential to a functioning modern touring unit, the guitar is just fine. I believe so, anyhow.
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby skully13a » Mon Jul 03, 2017 6:25 am

They just did a bit on NPR about this yesterday. Things change, that's all. It's not a big deal. My 2d cousin(12) is learning to play, and she's gonna WAIL.
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Omsong » Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:27 am

Doctor Turn wrote:Just re your timeline: I think the nineties to early 2000's were just as big for the electric guitar if not even bigger. ..
...But as an instrument considered essential to a functioning modern touring unit, the guitar is just fine. I believe so, anyhow.


:oops: I have to admit, Doctor Turn, that I was deep into acoustic music during the 90's and 00's and wasn't paying attention to the electric guitar trends and bands through that time period. But I agree with you there - the role of guitar has changed but it's still essential in the majority of popular styles. The amount and quality of young electric guitar playing talent, both guys and gals, that I see on Youtube is astounding. And there are a lot of local cover bands still playing music from the last 50 years helping to keep electric guitar alive! I wonder if that will continue as those of us from the Woodstock Generation pass on... A lot of my music idols from the 60's and 70's are already gone. :(
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Doctor Doug » Mon Jul 03, 2017 10:09 am

Electric guitar is fine. These articles are just clickbait. Companies with unsustainable business models are panicking because they realize they can't have Wal-Mart sized stores full of $2000 Gibsons that constantly sell.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:04 pm

skully13a wrote:My 2d cousin(12) is learning to play, and she's gonna WAIL.


I read this as "2 D," or "two dimensional." I then imagined a person trying to play a guitar in only two dimensions, and was amused.
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Omsong » Mon Jul 10, 2017 8:48 am

UnexplodedCow wrote:
skully13a wrote:My 2d cousin(12) is learning to play, and she's gonna WAIL.


I read this as "2 D," or "two dimensional." I then imagined a person trying to play a guitar in only two dimensions, and was amused.


Whoa, there... better cut back on the mind stimulants! :lol:
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Tue Jul 11, 2017 1:44 pm

Omsong wrote:
UnexplodedCow wrote:
skully13a wrote:My 2d cousin(12) is learning to play, and she's gonna WAIL.


I read this as "2 D," or "two dimensional." I then imagined a person trying to play a guitar in only two dimensions, and was amused.


Whoa, there... better cut back on the mind stimulants! :lol:


Quite the opposite; I need more of 'em so I can stay awake.
We are entitled to our own, wrong, opinions.

Guitar theorem: G=X+1 where G= guitars one needs, and X = guitars one has.

Do or do not; there is no understand.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby ScratchyRat » Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:11 am

There's a lot of truth to it, I'm a tech and I see the fold back , the majority of my customers are 50 and above and you dont have the number of new players as in the last three decades replacing them. From the biz side the issue that they don't touch on is the massive amount of guitars that were sold from advent of solid manufacturing with cnc machines. You had 100 times the guitars made than previous years just flooding the market with playable guitars. So the biz of guitars is at fault of over saturating a slowing market.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:37 am

ScratchyRat wrote:There's a lot of truth to it, I'm a tech and I see the fold back , the majority of my customers are 50 and above and you dont have the number of new players as in the last three decades replacing them. From the biz side the issue that they don't touch on is the massive amount of guitars that were sold from advent of solid manufacturing with cnc machines. You had 100 times the guitars made than previous years just flooding the market with playable guitars. So the biz of guitars is at fault of over saturating a slowing market.


I agree on the amount of guitars flooding the market. As for being a tech, do you work for a music store, or self employed? I do minor work (setups, fret leveling, nut filing/shaping, basic refinishing, some custom mods, and electronics) on my own, and have branched out from doing just my own to helping friends, family, and now others. I learned to do the work myself because of 3 factors: I had little money to throw at a tech, was not happy with the work done on my instruments, and had access to various machinist tools that could be used for my needs. Things just grew from there. I'm by no means the best tech in the world, and I will continue to learn, but just my existence has taken business away from the guitar stores, which may skew your experiences. The people who visit me are across the board on ages; ranging from teens to people in retirement.

Perhaps more small guys are cropping up, and causing the same thing to happen? Or maybe more are learning to do for themselves. It's all conjecture.
We are entitled to our own, wrong, opinions.

Guitar theorem: G=X+1 where G= guitars one needs, and X = guitars one has.

Do or do not; there is no understand.

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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby Doctor Turn » Fri Sep 08, 2017 9:38 am

Rather than the Gibson thread down below I thought I'd put this up here since it affects not only Gibson (who is in the biggest trouble obviously and the poster child for the problems described in the article) but co's like Fender and even large retailers like GC.

It's a LinkedIn piece about the state of the big guitar manufacturers and retailers called Is Big Guitar Inc. on the Way Out?.
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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Postby UnexplodedCow » Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:34 am

Good article, and is basically how I feel. Just the big names are in debt, and sales failing. They have failed to keep up with the changing tastes. That's usually how business goes.
We are entitled to our own, wrong, opinions.

Guitar theorem: G=X+1 where G= guitars one needs, and X = guitars one has.

Do or do not; there is no understand.


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